Vogue Logo

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Vogue Logo
Vogue is the most famous fashion magazine in the world. It was first published in 1892 as a weekly newspaper and was taken over by Condé Nast Publishers in 1909. It is distributed in 23 countries and has about 11 million of subscribers.

Meaning and history

Vogue Logo history


Vogue maintains its position above the masses with singular old-fashioned sophistication. Vogue Magazine’s logo has advanced in recent years, but its look is still based on Didone font styles.
Didone fonts were developed by Firmin Didot, Giambattista Bodoni and Justus Erich Walbaum, whose iconic typefaces, Bodoni, Didot, and Walbaum, remain in use today.

1890s

Vogue launched in 1892 as a weekly title for New York high society. A title’s nameplate was not confined to a single typeface. Each issue featured a hand-lettered logo created by the illustrator hired to do the drawing, complimenting the cover’s style.

1900s

By 1909, Condé Nast purchased the magazine, and the cover art became more colorful, theatrical, and abstract. First class illustrators created poster-like images for the covers, working in the Art Deco and Jazz Age styles popular at the time.

1920s — 1930s

Hand drawn logos remained throughout the 20’s and 30’s. 1932 saw Vogue’s first color photographic cover, shot by Edward Steichen, with a logo rendered in a minimal set of thin white letters. In 1933 the logo is still something the designers play with. The logo styles are still extremely varied.

1940s

1947 — appearance of the Didot typeface, although in a taller, more condensed version. Vogue still went back and forth with logo typefaces, jumping from serif to sans-serif and back again, and still mixing in scripts along with illustrative, photographic letters.

 1950s

By 1955, the all uppercase Didot, named for the brothers Pierre and Firmin Didot (highly regarded printers, publishers, typeface designers, inventors and intellectuals working during the 18th and 19th centuries), settled onto the cover of Vogue as a permanent logo.
Current covers also make use of a custom sans-serif font called Vogue AG, created by Terminal Design for Vogue in 2004, which mixes elements of Futura and Avant Garde Gothic.