Star Wars Logo

Star Wars Logo

Star Wars Logo History

logo Star Wars

The history of the Star Wars Logo began in the 1970s when the legendary George Lucas came up with an undoubtedly Cyclopic Star Wars saga. Back then it was clear that a rapidly growing project boosted by the appearance of numerous books and cartoons, as well as mini- and fully blown series, needed a graphic symbol to express the story’s whole load of tension and complexity, which was genially incarnated by Lucas.

In the 1970s and 1980s, first logos came up to crown the first episodes. Involved in the creation of the Star Wars Rebel logo, as well as the Star Wars Empire logo, were the world’s top graphic design gurus. In fact, everyone was welcome to offer ideas, and a kind of competition was organized with the goal of choosing the best logo or saga symbol.

The branding of the very first DVD version of the Star Wars trilogy was entrusted to brothers Greg and Tim Hildenbrandt. The pioneer logo, which was to symbolize as much as the whole new Universe, generated by George Lucas alone, is also attributed to these designers.

Star Wars symbol

Star Wars symbol

The Star Wars symbol covered movies (the original trilogy, prequels, sequels, etc.), as well as other visualizations ranging from TV series to computer games. What designers call the Lucas’s Universe retains all signature colors – black (stands for abyss, space, and countless worlds), and red (stands for battle, blood, struggle, and victory).

Once the saga’s cinematographic and mythical value became topped with a tremendous cultural significance, the Star Wars logo was a must for a demonstration of each and every related product – a cartoon or a miniseries. Finally, after the saga’s acquisition by the Disney Studio, the project expanded beyond the American continent. The symbol unified fans into numerous fan clubs and they would happily contribute to fanciful remakes of all types. Besides, first episodes would inevitably hit peak movie chart positions, both in popular and professional segments.

What was even more wonderful was not just the audience’s delight, but also some top critic’s reaction to the product. Experts were pleased to detect responses to challenges thrown by Akiro Kurosava, a famous Japanese film director, and compositional solutions that equaled Sergey Eisenstein. Besides, there were numerous flashbacks to Edgar Barrows, Edward Smith, Frank Herbert, etc. throughout the epic, which book and movie critics noted. All Mr. Lucas wanted to do was create a kind of fantasy world, whose special effects would have covered same old human weaknesses, vices, choices.  It would be that same old battle between the Good and the Bad, which would turn out to be more controversial and come down to choosing the lesser of two evils…

Star Wars Emblem

Star Wars Emblem

Eventually, the Star Wars emblem symbolized a stunning success for the 20th Century Fox, which was teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. And for the director, who became a legend overnight.  And for the new fantasy world, which was in for years of evolution and numerous media incarnations.

The second movie – the Empire Strikes Back – was directed by Irvin Kershner, the third one – the Return of the Jedi – by Richard Marquand. However, millions of fans still bestowed the creator’s role on George Lucas. All the more so, because he turned out to be a true marketing genius. After the release of the first movie and the outbreak of interest toward the saga, he initiated production of consumer goods featuring the movie’s symbols and logos – T-shirts, toys, and computer games based on the plot. Millions of fans, inspired by the new characters, endowed brand owners with revenues, which exceeded shooting and distribution costs by times. Lucasfilm spent decades monetizing the audience’s interest in the new world by licensing the production of numerous items branded as Star Wars (later, the brand was acquired by Disney).