Seattle Seahawks Logo

Seattle Seahawks Logo

The Seattle Seahawks logo is the sort of emblem that creates a strong emotional response. The aggressive, indigenous bird, whose fierce glare is not that easy to forget, has been only modified twice.

Meaning and history Seattle Seahawks Logo

Seattle Seahawks Logo history

The emblem was created in 1975, not long after the team got its name. Both the name and the emblem made their debut on June 17. Back then, the team’s General Manager John Thompson described a Seahawk in the following way: a “tough, fish-eating bird.” The logo featured a picturesque blue and green osprey’s head with a strong beak.

The 2002 emblem Seattle Seahawks

emblem Seattle Seahawks

At first glance, the logo was almost the same, as the core visual metaphor was not changed. However, in fact quite a few modifications took place, resulting in a cleaner, more aggressive and stylish look.

A shift in the color palette brought the following new shades: a lighter and a darker shades of blue and lime green. The redesign was done by NFL Properties in-house design team and was connected with the club’s moving to the NFC.

The 2012 symbol Seattle Seahawks

symbol Seattle Seahawks

In terms of the overall shape and the lines, the Seahawks logo has remained the same. Only the color scheme has been tweaked. Starting from 2012, it included the so-called College Navy and Action Green shades, as well as the Wolf Grey accent color.

The origin of the logo Seattle Seahawks

Seattle Seahawks logo

John Thompson, who was hired as the team’s general manager in 1975, mentioned that when the NFL firm was commissioned to design the logo, he asked them to “follow the Northwest Indian culture”. There were no strict conditions in this respect, but it was desirable to make the logo somewhat reminiscent of the Native American art. Also, according to Thompson, NFL actually mentioned referring to some books on Northwest Indian culture. This fact was even explored in a 1975 article in Seattle PI. However, in the course of time the origin of the logo was forgotten, and it was only in the 2010s that the connection was “discovered” once again and the newspaper article was unearthed.

The book that inspired the designers was Art of the Northwest Coast Indians by Robert Bruce Inverarity published in 1950. Here, there was a photo of a Kwakwaka’wakw mask. It was a so-called transformation mask existing in the two forms: when closed, it showed an eagle, while when it opened during the dance, it revealed a human face. It represented a supernatural eagle, also called thunderbird, which could exist in the human form.

The similarity with the Seahawks logo was absolutely obvious: one cannot but notice the bold line around the eye and the mouth, the distinctive eyelid lines, as well as the overall shape of the head and beak. Most likely, the mask was made somewhere between Alaska and Seattle.

Where is the mask now?

logo Seattle Seahawks

Shortly after the origin of the Seahawks emblem was rediscovered, the mask itself was found, too. It turned out to be part of the Hudson Museum at the University of Maine. Prior to it, the mask was in the property of the German artist Max Ernst, then, following his death in 1976, was purchased by a private collector, William P. Palmer III. His collection, in its turn, went to the Hudson Museum in 1982.

To make the mask closer to the Seahawks fans, it was brought from Maine to Seattle. At the end of the 3,200 mile journey, the mask arrived to the Burke museum, where it has been on display more than once.

Font of the Seattle Seahawks Logo

Font Seattle Seahawks Logo

The current Seahawks wordmark features a solid all-cap typeface. The type is perfectly legible, yet recognizable due to the distinctive sharp elements present on all the letters.

Color of the Seattle Seahawks Logo

Color Seattle Seahawks Logo

The color palette includes the shade of blue that is called “College Navy” (or ”Seahawk Blue”), as well as “Action Green” and “Wolf Grey.” All the three are the team’s official colors, also present in their uniform.